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and menaced the french troops in mexico under the emperor, maximilian. maximilian had come to power in mexico during the civil war and he has supported the confederacy former rebel troops streaming into mexico, seeking refuge. the state department opposed any actions towards mexico. so sheridan today clandestine cold war, arguably the first in u.s. history. he conducted conspicuous troop maneuvers near the rio grande river and the secretly provided mexican insurgents with weapons from the federal arsenal. partly due to sheridan zephyrs, but also events in europe, the emperor, napoleon the third cam withdrew his support of maximilian. maximilian's regime collapsed and the mexican insurgents that sheridan has ordered took control of their country. sheridan was a military governor of texas and louisiana during the early phases of reconstruction. the army commanders in the south were caught between congresses harsh reconstruction policies and president andrew johnson's opposition to them. most of them kept a low profile. sheridan did not. urged on by grant, he alone removed the light at officials
between us." in the book she shares her experience of going up in mexico without her parents who immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> reyna grande what is -- >> the way i grew up knowing it was a reference to the united states but to me because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. and during that time when my parents were gone working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think that my parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. >> where did you grow up and originally where were you born? >> i was born in mexico in southern mexico and the little city that no one has heard of. when i mention acapulco everyone knows i'll could poke so it was a few hours away from acapulco. >> windage of parents come to the united states? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was three years old and he sent for my mother a few years later so my mother came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> when did you
talks about her experience growing up in mexico without her parents immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> host: reyna grande, what is [speaking in spanish] >> guest: [speaking in spanish] the way i grew up knowing [speaking in spanish] was a reference to the united states. but to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. during that time that my parents were gone, working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think my parents were on the other side of those mountains. post a word as you grow up -- which is where we borne? >> guest: i was born in mexico and a little town that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, it is three hours away. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came in 1877 when i was two years old and he sent for another three years later. savanna that came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. poster wanted to come to the unit
were you born? >> guest: in mexico, southern mexico in a little city that no one heard of, but when i mention alcapaco, everybody knows that. it was three hours from there. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came here in 1997 when i was two years old, and he send for my mother a few years later in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states? >> guest: i came to the united states in 198 # 5. >> host: how old were you? >> guest: in may of 1985, nine and a half going on ten. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? what was your trek? >> guest: well, i had been separated from my father for eight years so when he returned to mexico in 1985, we convinced him to bring us back here. he was not coming back to mexico, and we didn't want anymore time separated from him. my father didn't want to bring me because i was nine and a half, and he thought i couldn't make it across the border because we had to run across illegally. i begged him to bring me here, and we too
you make reference to the u.s. and mexico and house do you view the effected of things such as transnational criminal organizations and confluence of radical extremists, the movement of iran into venezuela and the fact the we have a large border that is essentially flat. >> in my book talking about mexico because i believe anomaly is shining and the greater middle east crucial to the u.s. destiny but mexico is on the same level and on the same level of importance because latin history is moving north demographically. the average guatemalans is 20. the average mexican is in late 20s. the average american -- much longer populations growing at faster rates and ours and whatever we do with immigration there will be more latin speaking people in our society. donald flynn be wrote in the early part of the 20th century when you have an artificial border where much of the southern border is between a highly developed society and and economically less developed society the border doesn't stay stable but moves in the direction of the less developed society which ultimately finds
of chapter 2 of the book which is called titled "turn on," and it's in mexico in the summer of 1960. timothy leery brought the bull of mushrooms up to the nose and sniffed. the smell reminded him of musty new england basements or a downed tree rotting in a damp forest. it was now or never. he placed one of the black things in the mouth and followed up fast with a cold chaser of mexican beer. they tasted worst than they smelled, bitter, stringing, and he stuffed the rest in the mouth, washed it down with a few gulps of alcohol. it was supposed to be just a regular summer veigh dation cation, time to relax before starting the new academic year. he and his son, jack, now 10 years old, scouted out the city and found a villa for represent, a rambling white house with scarlett trim next to a golf course. a name comes from the aztec word of placed near trees, known as the city of eternal spring, its year round climate made it a popular get away spot for hollywood hairs, crime bosses, and the german born psychologist who studied social customs in a mexican village down the road from the leery villa.
of mexico. oil leaked into the pristine crystal clear waters at an incredible rate of over 2 million gallons per day. the result was an admirer of the wasteland dress a stretch of sludge and lock that extended from louisiana and florida. killed nearly all the seabirds in the region, destroyed fisheries, rendered beaches hazardous and unusable and took a once vibrant region and turned it almost overnight into an empty ghost town. wait a minute. best of what happened and all. that is what the of burma to liberals said was born to happen to what they imagined could occur. thanks to the historical drama types and the media, that's what we all fought. that is what cnn anderson cooper state his entire show on. the because he cares one bit of what the people in that region. the only visits the region when there's something in it for anderson cooper. the people who run the restaurants and hotels, they are not anderson cooper stern the people. he would not be caught dead vacationing in panama city of a gulf shores it is what depended on it. he's more of a martha's vineyard southampton's of speech can
in the desert in the winter of 1997 when i was broke kumbaya broke and and on drugs. in mexico city where i was lucky enough to go under a book contract from the art. i got advance said dream come true and in mexico city i had crossed the deadline and not one word written. i was broke i called the only friend i could count on because lifestyle allowed me to destroy relationships of friend and mentor to the solidarity network and said species begins spanish she had been to be living in bet negative would treat california. there are circumstances that led her how did she went up in the desert? everybody has a story how they got there. she said we will give you a place to live. wrote shortly thereafter one of the first things that i saw that says services 100 miles. year at 29 palms by joshua tree i fell to go further out. that is on the edge of a beautiful national park. you know, the album at least. [laughter] you know, what the joshua tree looks like. crazy arms. i wanted to go further out. there is something existential driving be further out to the big and the. also because the event go
to attack federal fourses in new mexico. journalist predicted that blood would soon be spilled in the halls of congress, and guns were drawn. in fact. and yet in the end, a solution, a compromise was found. the questions i began with were, how? how did congress make a paralyzed system actually work? and what would a close examination of the debates reveal about the costs of unyielding partisanship, and about the nature of compromise, and about the human qualities that it took to bridge a divide that many americans feared could never be crossed. and i should say, i also fell in love with the orator of the 1850s. the politicians of the time spoke per swayssively and provocatively and passionately in language that was so splendid it reached the level of literature. incidentally, all the speeches were available, down loadable for free, the library of congress. they make great reading, most of them. and thanks to the library of congress, they're making them available. the spin doctors argued and grammatically challenged messages that that today passes for political communication truly is patheti
by these principles. >> are they principles you had and used when you were governor of new mexico? >> always, always, and i actually delivered one of my state of the state addresses using the seven principles. look, here's how we need to conduct ourselves, and, anyway, just very -- very common sense. >> if you would, your philosophy and libertarian's philosophy on the role of government, the right size of government. >> so libertarian philosophy, with a broad brush stroke, the notion that most of us in the country are socially accepting and that we're fiscally responsible. that's a broad brush stroke, a broad brush stroke is wearing a pin lapel pin saying "i'm pro-choice regarding everything." well, pro-choice regarding everything means that actually if your choices involve putting other people in harm's way or your choices defraud or harm another human being, then that's when the government -- that's where the government has a role, to protect us against individuals, groups, corporations that would do us harm. >> as governor, did you -- did you shrink the size of the state government? do you -- you
with mexico and the civil war was a small club and so grant drank himself out of the army. no one would have thought anything of it except that when the civil war began grant vaulted over dozens of officers senior to himself who took delight in spreading stories of grant's drinking. i tracked accounts of grant's drinking to the extent that i could and discovered on two occasions during the civil war he got drunk to the extent that he got drunk and went to bed and slept off and look up the next morning. he never got drunk at a time when being drunk impaired his ability to perform his responsibilities. he got drunk once during the siege of vicksburg when nothing was happening. he never got drunk when he was president. this is a story that has stuck with him in part because it is a label. you can put on somebody and it is hard to disprove. the part about grand being a butcher is something that even occurred to some of grant's fans during the civil war, the civil war shocked american sensibilities win the war began. no one understood how big the conflict was going to become. how many people woul
of it was limited. the louisiana territory was purchased two decades earlier, but remained unorganized. mexico's north stretch from the sabine river on the gulf of mexico to the 42nd parallel on the pacific ocean what is now texas, arizona, new mexico, utah, nevada, california, colorado, oklahoma, and kansas. the pacific northwest was open country. back east, the appalachian mountain range guarding the interior from south carolina who what was recently maine threatened to confine the great american experiment to the atlantic sea board. the allegiance of the several transstates was unproven. there, settlers looked west down valleys to the mighty mississippi, not over their shoulders that the mountains that separated them from the political creators. former vice president conspiracy of 1805 and 1806 to make a nation for himself and others opened by the purchase had come apart, but illustrated limited control exerted by the east over the west of the national government over its unsettled territory. a continental nation so uncertain that president thomas jefferson deemed it optional, quote, "wheth
taught me about education. he often threatened to set me back to mexico if i can do well in school. >> is that it's very threat? >> it was because i really did believe him. >> you do not want to go back to mexico? >> no, i do not want to go back to mexico. and i wanted to make him proud. another thing i felt was because i begged him to bring me over here, i felt that i owed him out. i felt that i never wanted my father to say, i shouldn't have brought you. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. as we enter these last few months, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove. he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. here in new york are not going to see much of it. it will be spent in the battleground state. he has become king of the super pacs. $1.8 billion. to put that into perspective, in 2008, mccain had 375 million to spend. this is a factor of five. you're going to start seeing it come out now. the other thing that i
is that most of the -- de conquer during the mexico can pan with an army that's usually about 104,011,000. this is the third of the size of the army much smaller dvr me you see at places like gettysburg and scott is the only person that has much experience and by the time of the civil war he's too old to take the field. all of the future civil war generals are officers who have experience with what we would call major combat operations with its still a much smaller scale and after that all they did was right on the frontier or the fortifications, so their expertise is actually in many ways also terribly deficient. but it's better than what everyone else has, which is nothing. so, there is a very small professional army, but the army the union of the confederacy produced cannot be i will describe it as a profession i would say and so probably leading until 1862 >> if you teach this to carry the naval academy, what do you want students to leave with? spaight you never want to be that professor who is sox=@= obviously trying to sell books. the civil war, the big picture theme especia
of 1997 when i was broke, broken, and on drugs. i was in mexico city where i had been lucky enough to go under a book contract from new york. i got an advance from a new york publishers to write a book. a dream come true. in mexico city i had crossed the deadline and didn't have a word written and i was broke and i called the only friend i could count on at that point because my life style led me to destroy a lot of personal relationships. i call the performance artist lives in the united states for many years and the solidarity network, art and politics in the 1980s and i said [speaking spanish] >> in the village of joshua tree, calif.. there is a set of circumstances that led her, she is from the tropics in central america. how did she wind up in the desert? everybody has a story in the desert how they got there. she said [speaking spanish] we will take care of you and give you a place to live. i arrive in the desert and one of the first things that i saw when i rented my little shack in the sand next to a sign that said next services, hundred miles, town of 29 palms, felt myself drive
and that is 25 million more than delaware, new mexico and about ten orie 11 other states combined so there are people who don't have an id. that's the problem on the other side of the equation there isn't that much out there and i mean at the polls that we do see as absentee fraud as opposed to at the poll fraud so in ohio for example they did a study and they found that for every 2 million votes cast there was one that was improper so one vote out of 2 million so my biggest concern is we are throwing the baby out because the baby has a drop of bath water and we need to figure out how to focus on a drop of bathwater as opposed to bring the baby out. estimate what about the location of the polling places? >> it's important in the variety of factors one is the location but also things like a machine can't have money are in the polling place, and it's important because we want everybody to do but to cast the vote and if it is more difficult for certain people, certain populations and precincts that is great shape the outcomes and i will give you an example the officials knew they needed
, the tragedies in mexico, when is it going to end? it's not that dangerous compared to the pill and the meth. left wing, the right wing, evangelists for crying out loud. the truth is black and white. it's dangerous for me to sound like a cheerleader about any particular issue because people think i'm, you know, cheech or woody harrellson, but the real estate is from a journalist tick perspective, it's black and white, the billions that can be put back in the economy while hurting the cartels. i know they would know that the statistic that's cited, profits could be high, but the fact is quite a lot of organized crimes financing is not from the heroin and meth, but cannabis. we can have american farmers growing this, taxing it, and put narks back to work. their agricultural commissioner is begging to put it back to work for america's factories, clothing, and energy. i went to a stainability festival a few years ago, and the other speaker was usda expert on by -- biofuels. there's one that filters toxics out of soil.
troops were streaming into mexico seeking refuge. state department opposed any actions that might lead to war with mexico. so share dan -- sheridan conducted a clandestine cold war, arguably the first in u.s. history. he conducted con pick accuse troop ma nevers near the rio grande river and provided mexican insurgents with weapons from the federal arsenal. probably do to sheridan's evidents, and also due to events in europe, france's emperor, napoleon iii, withdrew his support of maximilian. maximilian's regime collapsed and the mexican insurgents that sheridan had supported, took control of their country. sheridan was a military governor of texas and louisiana during the early phases of reconstruction. the army commanders in the south were caught between congress' harsh reconstruction policies and president andrew johnson's opposition to them. most of them kept a low profile. sheridan did not. urged on by grant, he alone removed elected officials who defied congress' policies. fired scores of them. from city alderman to the governors of louisiana and texas. consequently, president jo
in this room but the wider american mainstream is waking up. i live in a place in new mexico where the cowboy hats and ladies in the post office saying barack obama was born in libya. when they ask what my book is about and i tell them it is and economic social analysis of why the end of the drug war was good for america, without fail the response is the tragedy in mexico and when is the drug war going to end? is not dangerous, when we going to stop -- left-wing or right-wing and televangelist. the truth is black and white. dangerous for me as a journalist with a few decades of experience, too much of a cheerleader about this particular issue. people are going to
where you say well, we have a border with canada, mexico, if you have a border of any state or enemy entity, look what's happening today in the south of israel. prime minister sharon decided to pull out from gaza. i was against it. in my book i write my personal expenses because i was very close to prime minister sharon. and when he decided to disengage from gaza, he was the godfather of my first son and i told him, you know how much i love you, and i want to support you and have you become the prime minister, but the minute we decided to go out and take jews out of the communities, i cannot walk with you anymore politically. and she took that decision. and what we expected, we expected if you take out the jews from gaza, or in your language, you evacuate the settlements, i hear a lot about the settlement. so we tried. we evacuated all the settlements in gaza. we took out all the jews, all the families who lived there. we even took the people who are buried in the cemeteries, took them out. we destroyed of the synagogues. we moved all of them out of gaza. and what did we receive in r
, and he often threatened to send me back to mexico if i didn't do well in school, but -- >> host: was that a scary threat? >> guest: it was because i real ly did believe him. >> host: you did not want to go back to mexico. >> guest: yeah, and i wanted to make him proud, and i felt that because i begged him to bring me, i felt i owed him that. i felt that i never wanted my father to say, i shouldn't have brought you. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award, on growing an illegal alien in los angeles, sunday night. part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> here's a look at books being published. mark bowden, author of black hawk down, chronicles the hunt for osama bin laden called, the finish. the killing of osama bin laden. journalist michael dons recounts the last six months of world war ii and the beginning of the cold war, six months in 1945, from world war to cold war. >> and william skinner one of the founders of the american silk industry. a man who turned disaster into destiny. >> in master of the mountain, thomas jefferson and his slaves,
he often threatened to send me back to mexico if i didn't do well in school. >> host: was that a scary threat? >> guest: it was a scary threat because they did believe him. i didn't want to go back to mexico and i wanted to make him proud. and then another thing i felt it was that because i baked him to bring me, i felt that i owed him that. i never wanted my father just say i shouldn't have right -- brought you. >> melanie kirkpatrick and joseph kim, one of the people profiled in her boat, "escape from north korea" to discuss the experiences of north koreans who fled the country. this book is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> did after nine welcome to the hudson institution new york book forum to celebrate the publication of "escape from north korea: the untold story of asia's underground railroad." by senior fellow, melanie kirkpatrick. i am ken weinstein, president and ceo of hudson institute and i also like to welcome our audience watching at home on booktv and i also want to especially thank our friends at c-span for covering today's event. there are a couple of g
, the only countries that are worse for mexico and chile. so what about germany? what happened is since 1985 the average salary of german workers has risen five times faster than in america. so if you can't afford to pay more and can't compete globally, how do all of the big companies do it? well, if the companies can make it the country as a whole can't make it may be as the economy as a whole. let me just tell you that in the last decade germany rated 2 trillion-dollar trade surplus against the competition from china, india, the asian tigers and the united states ran a 6 trillion-dollar trade deficit. so we are facing the same global competition that we were and they did $8 trillion better than we could and they were paying their workers more. how could that be? it doesn't make sense, does it? the next thing is we are told we can't compete on the old manufacturing basis. we've got to become a service economy. you've got to go out and learn knowledge shots. that's where the future is. i've got a couple of chapters on what happened to the knowledge economy in the last decade and my book. wha
in mexico where the cowboy hat and ladies in this post office think barack obama was born and when they asked me with the book was about and i tell them it is an economic and social analysis of why the end of the drug war would be good for america we failed. the response is when are the tragedy's in mexico. it's not that dangerous compared to the polls and the math. when are we going to stop arresting people for pot. left wing, right wing, they will go on this for crying out loud. the truth is black-and-white. it's dangerous for me as a journalist with two decades experience to sound too much of a cheerleader about any particular issue. you people are going to think i am cheech or maybe woody harrelson. the reality is from a journalistic perspective it is black and white civilians we can put back into our economy while hurting the cartels. i know it is up to 70% of the cartel's. but the fact is quite a lot of organized crime's are not from the heroine's of the mess, we can have american farmers growing dissent taxing it and on the industrial side but north dakota back. not to cut t
by compromise. and, finally, the late 1840s, the battle over the future slavery in the territory one from mexico, known as the mexican session, following the mexican war, was settled by the compromise of 1850. thus coming to look at these four examples, another such settlement to take place in 1860-61. the chief issue between the republicans and the south involves slavery. but not slavery in the 15 states where it exists. almost all americans in 1860, republicans included, believed that the constitution protected slavery in the states where it existed. rather, the critical question was slavery international territories, and the territories owned by the nation but have not yet become states. these territories comprised with you today today as the great plains, the rocky mountains and west of the rocky mountains to california. didn't include california because california as you know was already a state. question was so critical because it had to do with the future of slavery, and the future of southern power in the nation. now, southerners demanded what they saw as their constitutional rights as a
in this election. the u.s. attorney by the name of david ecclesia said new mexico lasses job. in 2004, he was passed by rove with prosecuting what rove cause voter fraud. and to find people fraudulently registered to vote. he investigated for several instead it's not happening. it doesn't exist. as a result of that, he lost his job. the brennan center at nyu school of law has been thorough investigation at the idea of voter fraud. they say basically it doesn't exist. there've been 10 or 12 cases in the first 10 years of this century out of hundreds of millions of those spirits someone may register as mickey mouse, but mickey mouse never shows up in rows. but nevertheless, rove has initiated a cam pain and its allies in more than 30 states legislature of having votes requiring voter ids. now part of the democrats are saying this is a severe form of voter suppression. that is in many cases you find the elderly was given up their drivers licenses, but it's perfect years, the out they no longer have a government issued i.d., so they are not allowed to vote. you have minorities that is hispani
a con team playtive and i meditate and had designed my little meditation space in mexico with a cushy looking out in to screenty and peace. but i discovered the world kept calling and i kept responding and i was trying to figure how i could bring them together. the call of the world and needing to sit on my cushy. i had this dream in which when i was my grandfather and i used to watch the cars go by in the little country road and he would choose the red, and i would choose the blew. it was one of the long straight georgia highways, you know. in my dream there in the middle of the highway was my cushy, my rose colored meditation cushy. i think my dream world was trying to telling me i can travel the world, but my cushy, you know, will have to be a traveling cushy. >> and the will be out next spring. >> yes. we've been talking here with alice walker at george mason university where the entire campus is reading in fact "the the campus provided students with the "the color purple." you would like to see more allies walker. booktv spent three hours with her. you can go to booktv.org type i
on ulysses s. grant, at the mexico drug cartel and margaret draper inside the house of representatives. the texas book festival live this weekend on booktv on c-span2. now on booktv actor tony danza recounts the year he spent teaching tenth grade english in philadelphia's largest bicycle. the author before becoming an actor wanted to be a teacher, recalls the initial troubles he had engaging his students and his later breakthroughs. this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> hello, everyone. white neck. what are we going to do? i can't believe when i am standing backstage listening to carol say those things about me, i want you to know, by the way, the cameras in january, i want you to see, i thought i had figured out a way to make teaching a. make it a tv job. i could be a teacher and her tv job. they left in january and by was a real teacher. i went listening to ms. carroll say those things to me. the greatest compliment at the end of the year, i had gone through this journey with her and i am reading yours, she asked me what i consider coming back, i thought was the greatest compliment, but
mexico and mexican war settled by the compromise of 1850. precedent and tradition in place for another settlement the chief issue between the republicans and the south but not slavery of the 15 states. almost all americans americans, republicans included the constitution and protected slavery. rather the critical question was slavery in the national territories and those that had not yet become states. geographically that we think of as the great plains and the rocky mountains to california. that did not include california. it was already a state to. the question was critical because it had to do with the future of slavery and seven powerpc in the nation. -- southern power in the nation. what is there constitutional rights as citizens? moving slave property into territories owned by the entire nation. the dread scott decision the united states supreme court confirmed the southern constitutional view. republicans will allow no more slaves on any territory. abraham lincoln elected november much later in est. congress came into session and to put forth a critical portion a way they dealt
of confusing. his father was born in mexico at some point to practice polygamy or something. he said it's too bad my father wasn't really a mexican. she was born in mexico but it's too bad he wasn't really a mexican. what was he trying to say by that? >> i think that he actually came out and said it a little bit later in the remarks i forget the words but that would be helping politically. my god it is easier to be a latino in this country than mitt romney. >> that's great. [laughter] >> he had the audacity to say that he would be doing better politically if he were latino. you did for awhile remind people that he had a sort of mexican heritage as they were trying to get the vote we've been hearing a lot about the romney election going on and i want to know your perspective on what really empowers the president, and that is the house and the scent to the consent. i have no comprehension on where the house is going. >> i think that -- people are being optimistic and saying it's possible that the democrats could take the house. i don't really expect that. when you see those it is usually kind o
nations counterbalance far better and more effectively and honestly that some of our states to. mexico, was just had an election, being a perfect example. a national id card. the election process is clear, transparent. frankly, no one questioned it after it happened. >> hi. >> asking why so many americans don't vote. what you think that is? >> well, i would turn around the question. if you had a choice between everyone voting, even if they knew nothing about the issues of the candid it's and cared nothing but the issues of the candidates and people voting 60, 70 percent of them, which is traditionally our number, but they did know something about the election are the candid it's , which would prefer? >> the latter. >> i hope so. you know, there are some people who sincerely believe this track and out of a democracy is that as many people as possible votes even in some cases if they know nothing or even if it doesn't mean anything. i disagree. i believe we have an informed electorate and to strive for an even more informed electorate. the bottom line is, we are not a country that finds
-- asked this question. the pipeline is a little thin right now. suzanne martinas, governor of new mexico, if you buy this idea we elect more governors than we do members of congress, that is where the pipeline is likely to come from. she is very articulate. has only been in office a couple years. give her six years depending on how she does. she has the potential. elizabeth warren fa depending on what happens to. she is somebody everybody is going to look at. we need to get more women elected as part of this. we only have 17% of the congress as women right now. research has been done at rutgers, to make any kind of a difference you need 25%, minorities in a body. part of a culture comes with congress seeing more women, more women having an opportunity to share important committees. one of the unfortunate things is a lot of the women we profile in this book who are still in congress, olympia snow is not running and has the same problem dianne feinstein had but on the republicans' side so a lot of women are giving up on it or don't see themselves being able to compromise, get things done i
:00 each w brand on ulysses s. grant, infiltrating mexico's drug cartel and robert draper inside the house of representatives. the texas book festival live this weekend on booktv on c-span2. .. [applause] >> well, one of the things that's fun for me about being here tonight, as gary mentioned, i am from san louis. it's always good to do these things in san louis. i have some wonderful people who shape my life in the front row. my second grade teacher. please help me to welcome that. [applause] and i know that if this book can have the kind of affect on just one person's life that pat and my other teachers had on me, this will be a very successful book. thank you very much for being matter tonight. i will begin the book reading cry from the very beginning where i asked jack people to imagine themselves in the navy seals training. this is out its starts. you stand in freezing water up to your chest. every muscle in your body throbs with pain. you're exhausted beyond anything you could ever imagine, and all around you the night air carries the curses and groans of others who are getting it ou
in los cabos mexico and he is co-founder of the new england institute for cognitive science and evolutionary studies, associate professor of philosophy and religious studies at the university of new england. he has been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way ine world, even though that way is often not great. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition, and into the conditions some humans place on play some others, we present him the anisfeld-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> the this is wonderful. and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i i'm going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals of course with the atrocities of the past, but i think it's useful to remind ourselves of the point of considering atrocities of the past is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible things t
her experiences in new mexico red at 8:30 p.m. eastern, and author details the life of hattie greene. who died in 1916 and use her family's inheritance against popular thinking at the time, resulting in a network of close to $100 million, which is equal to about $2.5 billion today. at 9:00 p.m., "after words." invisible wounds of war is the book. and we could include tonight's coverage with jeff cohen and john chase. the two "chicago tribune" reporters taking a look at the political demise of rumble goodrich. it happens tonight on booktv. >> the queen was making her way through a crowd of nearly 9000 people and reading a selection of guest. she was asking such standard questions as have you come far? one woman looked at her and said, what you do? [laughter] several days later at a friends friend's birthday party, the queen described the exchange in confessed that she had no idea what to say that it was the first time in all the years of meeting people anybody had ever asked me that question. well, my job in writing "elizabeth the queen" was not only to explain what she does, but to t
grant acquired in the army. the army between the war with mexico and the civil war was a very small and very gossipy club, and, okay, so grant drank himself out of the army. no one would have thought anything of it except that when the civil war began, grant vaulted over dozens of officers senior to himself who took delight in spreading the stories of grant's drinking. i tracked down accounts of grant's drinking to the extent that i could, and i discovered that on maybe two occasions during the civil war, he got drunk to the extent that he got drunk, went to bed, slept it off, and woke up in the morning fresh as a daisy. he never got drunk at a time when being drunk impairedded his ability to perform his responsibility. he got drunk once, for example, in the seize, where nothing was happen other than waiting for them to surrender. i never encountered a report he was drunk while president so this is a story that's stuck with him. in part because it's really -- it's a label you can put on somebody and it's pretty hard to disprove. the second one, about grant being a butcher, yeah. thi
was in mexico city where i had been lucky enough to go under a book contract from new york. i got an advance from my new york publisher to write a book. it was a dream come true and in mexico city in 1997 i had crossed the deadline and i didn't have a word written. and i was broke. i called the only friend that i could count on at that point because my lifestyle has destroyed a lot of my personal relationships. we had met through the solidarity network back in the 1980s and i said,. [speaking spanish] and she happened to be living in the area of joshua tree california at that time. she was from the tropics of central america. everybody has a story in the desert of how they got there. she said we will take care of you. shortly thereafter i arrived in the desert and one of the first things that i saw when i rented my little shack out in the stands next to a sign that said dax dacs service is 100 miles, the town of twentynine palms east of joshua tree i found myself to fieldtrip and to go further out. the joshua tree which is at the edge of a beautiful park. if you are for then there you know y
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